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20130106
20130114
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Book TV 46
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CSPAN2 46
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English 46
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CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 1:00pm EST
third lie." in the book professor gelles argues that the vast majority of government social programs don't work and suggests a different approach. this is about ten minutes. gls well, booktv is on the road. we're in philadelphia at the university of pennsylvania, and we're interviewing some professors who also happen to be authors. and we want to introduce you to the dean of the university of pennsylvania's school of social policy and practice. this is richard gelles on your screen. and one of his books, his most recent, is called "the third lie: why government programs don't work and a blue print for change." dr. gelles, i'm here from the government, and i'm here to help you. is that not true? >> guest: not true. >> host: why not? >> guest: because most government social programs which are designed to help people don't actually help. in some instances it is little more than the, i hate saying this, but the do-gooder full employment act. it provides lots of jobs for people who'd like the help, but at the end of the day if you look at whether the needle has been moved and people have real
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 3:00pm EST
a book called "killing unicorns." i get the unicorn. they don't. by the way, how many people are fans or "red eye." [cheers] >> all right. this whole unicorn thing got out of hand. the reason why i was talking about unicorns in the beginning of the show was i thought it would be odd and weird if a middle aged man would obsess with something a teenage girl would be, and i thought as a conservative, libertarian, it would be interesting to create like false narratives about you that would kind of throw off the left. if you assign certain kinds of behaviors to yourself, they don't know what to make of you. i learned this when i was at the huffington post, that i created this whole falls story behind me, that i lived with a flight instructor named scott. and he was never home. and there would always be some kind of weird stench in the basement, and i wrote this stuff because the left wasn't used to dealing with somebody who was messing with them. in the world of left and right, the right was always what i would call the dean wormer, from animal house. they delighted in that. my goal in lif
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 1:15pm EST
as a result of a whole lot of activities by marketers that we don't even see or know about. and relating to a transformation in advertising that almost anyone except people in the advertising industry doesn't know about. >> host: what does that mean? >> guest: in the last 20 years, advertising has changed drastically with the rise of cable and then the internet. originally, advertising was making an ad, a commercial and then putting on just a few very popular media; newspapers, radio, magazines. with the rise of cable, all of a sudden you had hundreds of channels, and then with the internet it's infinite. but more so you have tingal stuff, and it -- digital stuff, and it becomes interactive. part of of what we know about is that we can talk back to the advertiser, we can click on manager, there's a -- something, there's a whole lot of stuff going on under the hood where data are taken from us, are used, and we become creatures that are created by the advertisers to understand us and then change what we see on the web very often -- this is going to happen more and more as we move forward
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 1:00am EST
was absolutely right saying this chapter here, i don't think anyone's going to understand it, and he also made wonderful suggestions, and so we took a chapter out and put it in after wards, what it was like to get out of diplomatic service and go to rutgers university where i've been ever since as a professor, and in the very late 60s, early 70s, i went there in 69, and i'm still there, and i was supposed to go to vietnam as a culture, and i thought it was a stupid idea, and i had three little children i was not going to abandon that i i thought was not a good war. there's two stories i want to focus on this evening. one is about the day i spent alone with martin luther king in madrid of all places, and the other one is about one of the really terrible events of the cold war which is when the united states ended up dropping four hydrogen bombs on spain. luckily, unarmed, and not on purpose, and i'll tell you that story later. two very different stories. the king's story is a soft story, and the bomb story is a hard story. before i do that, i thought i'd tell you about a few of the other chapte
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 1:30pm EST
, what they think they know because someone told them what they don't know what all. the other difficulty about writing about the recent past is that it's not always easy to establish the past. the past that is so close to us. and yet, this is. to take apart, or commonsense view of the recent past and to interrogate what we think we know. to demystify a comedy mythologize, to move beyond the clichÉ about winners and losers and saints and sinners and the wisdom and encourage of our forefathers, especially those of the greatest generation. our job as historians. grounded in evidence. the life of joseph p. kennedy was, for me, a sort of anti-fun house mirror. which, if i looked at it long enough, would reflect back to me often a hazy and indistinct, distorted forms, images of the things and people and places which organized and arranged and told the story of 20th century america. i was a colleague of arthur's lessons are in the city of new york. i had used a treasure trove of material is that jean kennedy smith's daughter, who is writing letters from her father to her aunt and uncles, and i
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 3:00pm EST
with two veterans, benjamin, who serve in the marines, and brian in the air force. i don't belong on a panel with people who actually lived through it, although my book is about war as well. last through, there are other veterans in my book are actually here. stan and dave roller are in the back there, and thank you for being here. means a lot to me that you're here. [applause] >> one of the things i'm asked is why did i write a book about this one combat outpost in afghanistan? it's not really my area of expertise. i'm a political reporter, the senior white house correspondent for abc news. the answer is i feel like i at any time pick combat outpost quieting to write about. i felt like come about outpost keeting picked me. on october 3, 2009, i was in the recovery room of the hospital with my dear wife, jennifer, and i was holding our day-old son jack, and everything was fine. she had a baby so that's why we were there. and out of the corner of my eye on the television, i heard a story that was just harrowing from this remote outpost, that i'd never heard of, at the bottom of thr
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 5:15pm EST
the book pretty readily. with publishers producing fewer books every year now, if they don't patronize stores like this or independent stores, they're going to find that there aren't going to be books around. there is already a decrease in the number of books that are available because of the-books, textbooks being put on line instead of being produced. so there will definitely be a decrease in the number of books available. if stores like this still survive there won't be books readily available for the public. as the book business continues to change, i would like to just be able to persevere and stay here for the indefinite future. >> for more information on book tv recent visit to providence, rhineland, and the miniature cities visited by our local content vehicles could to c-span.org / local content. >> next on book tv, henry gallagher recalls his assignment as officer in charge of the security detail for james maraniss, the first african-american admitted to the university of mississippi in september 1962. this is about 60 meant -- 40 minutes. >> thank you, ralph, john. my gratit
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 11:15am EST
would not have had a green job. if they installed regulatory, they don't have green jobs. if the install low flow toilet, they have green jobs. farmers, if they grow corn for ethanol, they have a green job. if they grow corn for ethanol and corn for people to eat, they have a green job. if they just grow corn for people to eat, even though they are farms, they don't have green jobs. salvation army workers, if they recycle used clothing, then they have green jobs, too. well, there are 4665 people who produce renewable energy and utility companies, according to the bureau of labor statistics. they just report which came out in april. they are clearly green but you have to ask, are they making energy more expensive or are they making it less expensive. well, it's clear that they're making energy more expensive. the average level has cost entering service in 2017 according to the department of energy is it there till by natural gas which cost $66 per megawatt hour, for wind, $96 per megawatt hour, for solar power, $153 per megawatt hour. well, five years ago in 07 when the energy loan guaran
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 1:35pm EST
in a constitutional convention as a moderate in montgomery alabama in february of 1861. i don't think he ever did stand for election. one of the things americans think, one of the things they're told, the confederate constitution was a replica of the u.s. constitution, but it was not. a number of crucial changes, and one of them was they had a one-term executive, and i believe it was 5-year executive term. he avoided reelection. >> professor mccurry, did -- was there a lot of political infighting during the war? >> yes. there was. and there were no for more -- for all political parties. one of the things that is interesting is that it so quickly became on the ropes that a lot of things that were planned never really materialized. and there was political opposition, but it was theoretically everybody was a democrat. there was no republican party. no republican party ticket offered in the south. you could not vote for lincoln. but there were all lined with the southern wing of the democratic party. during the war opposition arose, and some were profoundly opposed to the davis administration, on ver
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 12:00pm EST
in events, and the book, itself, is called "blind spot" don't together with roberta, and my colleague, who is here today, paul marshall, published by oxford press and won several literary prizes. it's also included work on a book entitled a table in the presence which was written by lieutenant commander kerry cash which concerns his experiences as a chaplain in combat in iraq. another portion of her work, also within the general area of religion, has focused on the fate of christians around the world, and in particular, their prevails in recent years. this included the award winning "their blood cries out," also co-authoredded with paul marshall, and "eyewitness to a broken world," and cox is a distinguished member of the house of lords, famous as a campaigner for human rights and for christian rights. there will also be out fairly soon another book called "persecuted: the global assault on christians" to be out in early 2013. this brings me tore most recent book, the one we are here to discuss with her. i have many questions to ask her, but before doing so, let me say a few general things
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 12:00am EST
are very. were not going to talk about that. don't worry. i was forced to make and a couple of questions raised about "witness" and one might say more generally anti-communism are relevant today. the first place where subfor clearly gets development when we deal with the great communist power communist power of the day, china. chambers -- this is a passage i like. chambers wrote, what i had been felt for me like 30 rags. the rags wrecks itself for me where not a there communism but a new web in the mine, loomis shroud which has part of the spirit of man paralyzing the name of rationalism, the instinct of his soul. denying him the name of knowledge the reality of his soul and his birthright in that mystery on which new knowledge falters and shatters at every step. we now watch the soulless chinese communist party battle chinese christians, chinese buddhists, and believe that they can only offer a few more better factory jobs in port cities that will provide the answer to the chinese people's freedom. everything in that sense that chambers wrote about communism and its failures is quite ad
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 5:00pm EST
talked to people, don't just take pictures of empty buildings with nobody in the picture. >> that's one of the things that struck me about the book. it's not to treat the building. is to treat the. in some cases it's the people you happen to cross. it's not talking heads, not public officials, not price people. vicious people you met. one of my favorite stories in the book is the day you go down to the site of the original train from which now has a hotel on it that is sitting there empty and you met a bunch of different people down there, but one of them was this guy, tony. i wanted you to talk about how you met him hemline included him in the boat. >> at least asserted a telling moment. i guess i loved that kind of moment because of the serendipity of it. i'd been reading a lot of detroit history. it wasn't long after i got here. you know, as people here know, near the plaza is where cadillac, the french explorer, land owners a statue and so i've been reading about that and decided in this an unusually sunny day in the fall, so i decided to make my way down there and sit outside. it w
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 2:30pm EST
of what i call terminal censorship. now, go back to the history, and i don't mean just me personally. i'm talking about the society in which i live, in which i was raised, the history of my people as i now write in the book, when the european explorers, of course, always quickly followed by religious storm troopers, the missionaries came to africa on the mission of conversion, they had a very serious problem, and that was they could not find satan. they couldn't find the denver. now, if you want to convert people, you have to persuade them that they -- that their soul is in dire danger, that they are headed for the ultimate bonfire on the other side of existence. from that, you need to label them followers of the devil, satan. they look for the devil, and looked among the deities, and complex religion, very elaborate, well structured, and they looked among the deities, and they found issue. now, whose issue? i refer to this as the imminent imminent -- an issue to teach humanity that there's always more than one side to any issue, more than one face to any appearance, the best plans advi
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 8:00am EST
, but you realize thatyou don't -- this is your time to pin the regime and colonel gadhafi to the wall. if you don't expresses what you want from this and have a clear end goal, things will not work out well. and we're willing to say that even if we are poised to make a lot of money out of this. this wasn't the view of everyone, of course, but these kinds of hushed sort of warnings resonated very strongly with me. and i think are in some ways explained or increasingly explained by some of the news that we're hearing in retrospect about what actually went on during some period of the gadhafi regime. so, you know, the book, i think there were basically four takeaways, four main points that i try to make, and one of them is very, sort of has been brought into profile by the presidential debate and the whole issue of what happened in benghazi on september 11th which is the, what i call the myth of libya's irrelevance to u.s. policy. and i think over the course of, if you go back to the foundations of the libyan state in 1951, you know, u.s. relations with libya have been, you know, u.s. ha
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 1:25pm EST
justice system, think the system makes sense. it's cheap, it deals with staggering caseloads. but they don't understand why it is that the nonlawyers are frustrated. it seem like justice has been bought and sold and modified -- comodified. so you get voters clamoring for tougher laws and lawyers bargaining these provisions away so that some people get special deals and other people who are just stubborn enough to vote at trial wind up getting heavier punishments. and the voters react because it seems like it's hidden, and it's low visibility, and it depends on your connections or your lawyer rather than on what you did. and the frustrating thing here, of course, is we have a democracy, and the system should be run for what the people think it's about which is blaming and punishing. but instead we have a system where people don't even understand what's going on in this their own system. we can't go back to an era where every case was tried by a jury. our system is too clogged, trials take far too long today. over the past half century, we have made them too complicated. but what we can do i
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2013 7:00pm EST
.. i don't want to begin neglecting to mention a few things. one, as you really want to thank cowles for continuing to be piles. but to restart what they used to be. if you're not bill clinton or naomi wolf or whatever, it is to be various bookstores like this all over the country and now my book to raise town hall in seattle, towels books to your here, politics & prose in d.c., when in new york, one in boston. frankly i'm not trying to go to more bookstores because it's hard work to travel over the place. now i have two kids and everything changed. it is that, got friends in san francisco who want to see me. another some good hucksters in san francisco. what you have here is very special. i want to acknowledge a couple groups if you're interested in urban design issues in this area, the group to talk to first base enu cascadia for new urbanism and i'm sure you can find them online, but they're concerned about the issues of the talking about tonight and descriptive for 20 years has in pushing these issues forward the strongest. i want to acknowledge the mayor who i'm so glad h
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 7:00pm EST
citycamorra service to to depression, mound of work? so you can't blame them really, although we don't agree it is the gateway to the west. we think of st. louis is the exit from the east. [laughter] there's some similarities between t.s. eliot and me. we both use foreign language in our poetry. he tends to use sanskrit. i don't use much sanskrit. i don't actually know much sanskrit. as one of those kids who got a got a new to during sanskrit class in kansas city, sort of look out the window. [laughter] i use yiddish sound. i think it's fair to say that t.s. eliot was not partial to yiddish. my shortest palm using skittish. they shortest palm is called something like the societal political and philosophical implications of the o.j. simpson trial. title does that count in the links. and the poem once jack, oy vey. fastmac and also in yugoslavia started to break up, i did a palm that had croatians are the good guys now, although their past is somewhat shady, so worry not that these same guys chased both your would be in your cd. [laughter] with both use a little german. when george w. bush app
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 7:00pm EST
talk so dramatically and in such a negative fashion about the adults who fill our prisons, and we don't realize that every one of those adults was a child who we could have done more for, to prevent a lot of the challenges they face as an adult, and i think douglass said at it easier to raise strong children than to heal broken men. so i just feel a real urgency in america that we do not prioritize our children as much as we should. >> tina, he favorite part of the book is your forward. which is lovely because we work for two and a half years on the book, but at it so move bag it's so from the heart, and this week you're doing michigan else from the heart. you're engaged in the snap challenge. maybe you can talk about the snap challenge and why you're doing this. >> well, my staff teases me. i was up late with my girlfriend, twitter, and -- [laughter] >> when is the mayor going to get a life. but i was going back and forth, and for those of you who use social media, people just roll out things that are dumb, frankly, and -- but just as i was getting into an intellectual question about
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 7:30pm EST
they don't want any troops but in my discussion they don't think about it which is what we face today is a question of state formation. and in 2004. what i mean by that is and attempting to build the afghan state what happened was on the one hand they put money into kabul but at the same time we had independent and unilateral agreements in the periphery. with the private militia that were funded and supported. stood to create the afghan police we also gave the government of canada our to maintain his private militia the does not answer to the afghan government. and you can create a state with the basic definition the there is a series that to give an example may be 200 scattered around the country to have afghan and militiamen these are irregular militiamen with private security contractors we require those that need to be protected from the insurgent attacks to be paid directly or indirectly through the subcontracting machines the six year 70,000 young men those who do not fall under the afghan government purview whatsoever in all zero of their existence entirely so what happens when
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 8:15am EST
designed to play a secondary role to nations whose sovereignty we saw as inviolable. and, you know, i don't think that's sustainable because so many of the interests you or i have as individual citizens of wherever we.com from are really affected by decisions that happen on the global stage. >> host: dade rothkopf is our guest. the numbers are up on the screen if you'd like to participate. 202 is the area code, 585-3885 in the east and central time zones, 585-3886 if you live in the mountain and pacific time zones. mr. rothkopf, former managing editor -- managing director of kissinger associates and current ceo of foreign policy. what is foreign policy? >> guest: well, it's -- the fp group is a division of washington post that publishes foreign policy magazine. the foreign policy web site which is now much bigger than the magazine, we have almost three-and-a-half million visitor a month to the web site and run a series of events and other programs on international issues. >> host: mr. rothkopf, in "power, inc." you have a chapter, a chapter about a swedish goat. what is that story? >> gue
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2013 7:00am EST
really don't know much about. the u.s.-mexico war, people don't write about it a lot but it doesn't have a big place in sort of the historical imagination of americans. there's a number of reasons for the. it's often confused with the texas revolution that happened eight years before, or ignored altogether. when historians to talk about the u.s.-mexico war, they tend to think about the war in relationship to the civil war. and they narrate the u.s.-mexico war as sort of the first stop on the road to succession. arguing that the land again from mexico at the close of the war was what really caused sectionalism to heat up. in fact, all that is to say you can look at the war as sort of the moment that the civil war became inevitable if you want to look at it that way, or you can look at on its own terms which is what i tried to do in this book. what i was interested in doing when i wrote this book is to show the impact of the war on individuals and on families. the u.s.-mexico war had the highest mortality rate of any american war, 15% soldiers who served in mexico after the united states d
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 8:00pm EST
on the don imus show when it was really popular. they figured, we have always said corruption. it predates buddy. it will post a him, but at least he made us feel good about ourselves. at least the, you know, helped the province back on the map. that's what people left in. >> for more reformation on book tv recent visit to providence tomorrow diamond and the many other cities visited by local content vehicles go to booktv.org / local content. >> next, the history of scandals surrounding the intimate lives of u.s. presidents since 1789. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> okay. can everyone hear me okay? all right. i'm robert watson. first off, welcome. side of the third and final presidential debate this past october 22nd. a quick note on some of those awards that i have one, the topic i will be discussing the state -- today is not the topic at stake. just a point of clarification. we are here to talk about my new book, k-9. and what i was trying to get at with the book was this, rather than just tell stories about presidential misbehavior, the book is not just about who did it,
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2013 11:00pm EST
'm tucked away in the midwest. i don't have convenient ak is eases to a lot of the wonderful archives on the east coast. i don't have access a lot of the originals that are found in the library and institution across the country. i made a point to collect them. much like my other historical collectible. they are available for sale or purchase. if any has seen "american pickers" i would say it's like that. i would say i'm like that more along the license of historic documents and newspaper. i'm traversing the earth trying to find and locate and take newspapers out of rare book shops and european book dealers and people dishoiferred them in at dicks and behind balls of old homes. it's an exciting discovery process. and these newspapers eventually accumulated to where they became a significant selection. one of the most significant private collection of american revolution newspaper. and the story it told or they told is fascinating. one that deserves to be shared and with the general readership, which this book fully accomplishes. so tonight what i want to do is walk you through what i
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 3:45pm EST
. that is it. i suspect that they week of screaming because they don't have control. speaker john boehner, and kevin mccarthy -- this class of 2010 of the 87 freshmen, but these guys came in novel holden by any means to leadership and made it very clear from the outset that they were not going to just fall into line. it will prove to be the case when the democrats regain power. the enforcement tools are indeed of yesteryear. especially since earmarks have now been banned and with the blogosphere, you can turn someone into an instant martyr by stripping them of their committee assignments. it is very hard. so there is a point in my book that i refer to after the debt ceiling fiasco of the summer of 2011 when i came back in yet another continuing resolution used to fund the government and the obama administration had not passed a budget and it was coming out. the republicans in the leadership believed that the own members voted against it. and the appropriations committee, which defined these resolutions and all others was insisting on a meeting with the leadership. we are cutting spending
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 6:00pm EST
the and to get their. we certainly don't have enough time. those of you that haven't read the book if there are any of you that haven't read the book yet, don't want to give it away but i do want to talk about the match race which after reading your book and studying this, this race sounded like the super bowl would be today. >> there were 40 million people listening to the race between seabiscuit and corev oral, a triple crown no rival. they were rifles and it took years to put this together. 40 million people will listen in on the radio. that's one in every three americans. >> including the president that put the staff on hold. >> he had his cabinet sitting in the room waiting and he was listening to the horse race. >> you had to read about the special trains that were coming just for the matches like this. sort of describe the festive environment of the match such as that. >> i spoke with a man that a range of the match race who died a couple of years ago, and he said this was an event that every single person in america cared about, and it was in every single newspaper. i went
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 9:00am EST
true of consumers. citizens is a little vague and, perhaps, sort of overinclusive. but today i don't have to worry about that. i can just say that we're talking about a public of readers, and those are old readers and young readers, they are sophisticated readers and casual readers, they are sighted readers and blind readers. all readers together. so to begin, what do all these readers like about printed books? as i was trying to think of themes here, i went to the wonderful elizabethizeen stein's new book, the response to print in the west from first impressions to a sense of an ending -- now out in paperback, i'm happy to say -- [laughter] and the professor suggests two answers to the question what do readers like about the book drawn, of course, from the history of the early reception of print. and one answer, i think, is that readers from the very beginning, from the 15th century forward have responded very positively to the fixity of the book, the apparent stability of printed pages bound between stiff material gives to text and their meanings. she writes: printing came to be
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2013 8:30pm EST
using social media. and i'm sure he would have. would he have change the language? i don't know. of course that is what we are here to discuss. which would bring us to the subject of the may king of books which is you know the bible tells us, there is no end to the making of books and we are very fortunate to have a great panel of speakers. we are still waiting for the fourth one to calm and i hope she will, dissenting on us like an angel from on high, but we have two representative -- i wanted to make sure we had two representatives of fiction from different houses and i chose nan talese and geofrey kloske because i thought they were two very different corners of the industry and it turns out that jeff, i think it was 10 days or week ago penguin and random house have merged making probably the largest trade publishing conglomerate in the world. although i thought i was inviting people from two corners of the world, they have become one corner of the world even as we have gathered together here. we also are very fortunate to have karen lotz of candlewick and walker, company that
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 7:00am EST
don't know yet. i think it's still too early to tell. but certainly the last generation or two of american politics has been dominated by a more conservative orientation of the whole political culture. and i think using the family, something that we are all familiar with and comfortable with as a lens to really tell us a lot about that transformation. >> for more information on booktv's recent visit to providence, rhode island, and the many other cities visited by our local content vehicles, go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> next on booktv, caroline kennedy, daughter of former president john f. kennedy, presents a panel discussion on the collection of recordings of the late president in conversation from the oval office and cabinet room in july 1962. the tapes include discussions on numerous topics of the day, including the cuban missile crisis and vietnam. this is about an hour. >> good evening, ladies and gentlemen. i'm the executive director of the john f. kennedy library foundation and on behalf of my colleagues, the director of the john f. kennedy presidential library and
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 1:15am EST
. they could even have a body scanner at the door. but they don't but with the video demonstration they say that burqa has a security issue. but a reasonable demand would be a muslim woman having a full face federal on her driver's license with suitable for of -- i don't think the requirement is incompatible with the quote liberty. we also know the face is a bad identifier. i recognition in fingerprint technologies have already replaced them. win broad the available and have spread we could do away with a photo which of what remains of the first argument. we need a little something more to focus on transparency. of the already replied to the many context that we do make contact with other citizens while they face and remain covered. the longstanding traditions say the eyes are the windows of the schoolhouse. contact is made to me more theorize then nose or mouth. once during a construction project in my office i had to cover everything except my eyes but very soon they're asking me how to get a mask. my personality did not feel stifled nor did they feel they cannot access my individuality.
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 9:00pm EST
of the book, and why don't we open the floor for questions and answers and take the discussion whenever it goes. good. there's another microphone. good. >> i'm sitting near the microphone so i'll grab my chance here while i can first in line. your last the last idea that you just presented is the central idea that the regime now faces the problem of coming up with the technology and the where with all to expand to sort of invest in the industry and develop the industry more than they have in the recent past. is the -- do they have a, you know, i think of russia as being fairly technology logically competent. do you see any great dependence they're likely to have for any number of years in developing their own technological exaipabilities -- capability through the educational foundation of it or just any other aspect of oil and gas technology so forth that they can't produce come up with their on own reasonably inexpensively or at least in comparison to what they have to sort of come up with if they have to deal with the rest of the world? and in particular, of course, whether they'll be
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 9:00am EST
of the building to i think they come because there's a real sense of community. we don't have library cards. it's almost like cheers where everybody knows your name and you walk into the building. we are not necessary the quietest library either because the circulation desk is located right in the center of the space. we are always saying old friends as they come in. we actually predated the public library movement when the providence library and company was formed. it was based on the benjamin franklin idea where the company, the founding fathers actually had a company and they bought shares. so they invest in that and they use those resources to purchase their books. the early organization, the providence athenaeum, had also done a similar thing. so basically we were organized, we were membership-based libraries. and so the members of that organization purchased shares and then they made those available to their families and so forth. when the public library movement came into being, then, of course, they were using the resources from the community to support those libraries. membership libra
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 4:00pm EST
or driver's license most islamic scholars agree on this point* i don't think this is not compatible with equal liberty. we know the face is a bit in the fire with fingerprinting technologies have already replaced the phone know when they are broadly available and spread to police on patrol, airport security, we could do away with the photograph the need to say something about the argument that focuses on transparency. talking about civic life we to make contact with other citizens waving to them on the street the longstanding traditions told that the eyes are the windows of the soul. is thought to to be made more to the highest in the nose or the mouth. during one construction project i actually had to cover everything but my eyes at first they founded a beard but soon there asking me how to get a mask like i had. they did not feel they could not access my individuality. also people have difficulty talking to people who look odd. there is a tendency to blame this on the person who looks odd rather than yourself. those of the disabilities are stigmatized. mental and physical are excl
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 4:30pm EST
weapons to factions that are fighting the regime that are aligned with our interests or not, and if we don't do this, won't the more extreme elements in the region support the radical islamic rebels fighting assad, and our stake in syria is we want the people to prevail closer to our interests than those of the radical muslim interests, but, yet, we are not supporting them materially. there are reports from syria saying there's a fair amount of resentment on this. one fact i want to point out is al-qaeda in iraq, which is an affiliate of al-qaeda central and was a big threat in iraq, is now heavily involved in the syria con thright under the front, and one reason it's able to do that is because we took our forces out of iraq in 2011. if we had just several thousand forces there working with iraqi special operations forces, i believe we could have attenuated the growth of al-qaeda in iraq, this iraq, and its influence in syria. it's an inadvertent consequence of the removal of all american forces at the end of 2011. >> host: your book gave insight into the syria connection as you call it, g
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 11:15pm EST
. i think -- while i don't have a crystal ball, i think there is little doubt that the president would be willing to compromise if the other party is willing to meet him part of the way. now the other party's job is to see how much it can get from its side of come and given the issues we've been through such as the fiscal cliff, the fact is there is no way out of these issues without compromise, but i do think that we would see compromise on something like immigration reform because demographics is destiny, and the republicans as well as the democrats recognize that they have to show some support for immigration reform if they are not going to in the case of the republicans move the hispanic population permanently to the republican party. so, the president has already shown willingness to compromise, and all of the data shows that republicans are the party that moves further to the right and the democrats moved to the left although both parties have moved to the extreme, so i think we are going to see the president because he won the election being tougher rhetorically about not compro
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 11:00pm EST
there. they wanted to talk about their families. was thinking via other night i don't think any of them talked about the future but four hours and hours of a talk to the young mariners most of whom were lost and for what it meant to them. so i think it was just listening to the people. we were having a hard time being recognized so the queen mum very kindly came on our boat. so she could make it look more legitimate so we were more accepted as part of the navy. and of course, she came with her high heels. [laughter] it was good of her to do that. >> host: i was struck that the young people don't have with mortality but there was a teacher -- future bids you were married at the age of 19 this year has been too was a medical doctor you had two babies at the time and you thought it would be relatively easy transition and because they spoke english? that that the whole was not true? [laughter] tell us about that. >> coming to america i was quite irresponsible it was not quite as simple as that i had no idea where the mayo clinic was. i could not get passage until november i arrived in minne
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 12:30am EST
religious laws in america i guess? >> guest: well, the salvation army which many people don't realize is an evangelical religious group, not just a group that rings bells outside department stores in the christmas season. the salvation army believed what they called the cathedral of the open air and would go into areas, especially impoverished areas, and have parades and make lots of noise with brass bands and symbols and loud preaching, trying to attract especially the urban poor back into religious life. this came up against requirements in many cities that any parade be a affirmative. the salvation army made it a practice not to apply for permits and to be arrested, often playing there and cements on way into the cells and challenging these laws of anti-religious. they won a lot of them. they also lost a lot of them so they kind of destabilize the law of the state's by challenging these restrictions. they never really made it to the supreme court of the united states though because the states were still in power. >> host: professor gordon wended the first major religious case come
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 7:00pm EST
>> i don't have a copy. "talibanistan" negotiating the borders between terror, politics and religion" i just want to say a few words of the subject matter to be discussed today were the of what became a years of endeavor and peter bergen will be your host and moderator today. catherine unfortunately is not here to the -- today but is a:editor about the taliban and its environment southern afghanistan, and western pakistan. to get at them itself when the united states was puzzling over its resurgence in afghanistan as a military challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 arab emirates that it presented itself as a grave dilemma to the obamacare administration so we try to provide the regularity about this phenomenon recognizing the cliche image of the of one i aid malaya and his band of fanatics was inaccurate and falsified the problem. said not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban but look at its diversity and aspects of the character fetter not part of american debate to. i am really proud of this book and peter whose leadership from new amer
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 10:00pm EST
and the difficulty i don't know what i think and tell i right but the real reason "witness" evoked mixed emotions came from the parallels with which i had a closer connection. the unimaginative titled american life. to go back and look 800 pages is not a brief with not one single reference to whittaker chambers in it so i appreciate the forbearance biographer at hand and house for not mentioning this embarrassing fact in his long review of my book last winter. although he did refer briefly to chambers in the second volume of the memoir to take a couple of pages to say he followed the case carefully but was still unsure as many people were in 1972 of who to believe. it is much more clearly now the to the courageous scholarship to offer the pioneering work that nobody could reasonably doubt the truth from soviet sources over the last 20 years. you could still get in trouble if you shout from manhattan alger hiss was guilty. [laughter] what so strongly struck me was less out it holds up but what i had not expected is what seems to be the number of similarities between the personalities of whittaker
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 6:00pm EST
and nine seeing me cry at the moment saying i don't understand what's the matter. don't worry, they will win next year. i didn't have the heart to tell them the hadn't won and this might be the moment. after seward's devastating defeat that he claimed to leave public life making francis happy thinking she finally had him at home but she soon came to understand his need for action and to be in the middle of things and his patriotic zeal would bring him back into public life again and when lincoln asked him to go into this cabinet is the secretary of state accepted and became a great secretary of state. so with these behind us let me turn the comparative perspective on abraham lincoln. like seward and chase, lincoln's ambitions are forged early in life even as a child historian douglas wilson has written ki duty with fresh from those around him, he was unusually gifted and had great potential. his ambition led him to memorize the stories he heard listening to his father took to the adults at night and then the next day the tree stump to entertain his juvenile friends. the invent
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 10:00am EST
at that moment? that is the hero of the story? i don't think so. i think we have to go back and look at the rebellion itself and especially to look at those africans who made the rebellion. so we have in both history and film is actually very good history from above, history that stresses the likes of john quincy adams. but i want to do is write a different kind of history, what is called history from below. whose history is it? whose rebellion was it? what does it mean to us now? those are questions i wanted to pose. well, in the course of doing this research i must tell you this project was full of surprises. it is a story that everyone thinks they know, and that thought that i knew it too but it turns out, there were so many surprises, this put me in mind of a phrase formed by a very it would it american historian, lawrence levine, in which he talked about the unpredictable past. it is a great phrase. what i found was that the pastor of the amistad was extremely unpredictable, as to what i would like to share with you today are some of the surprises. what were the surprises of doi
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 5:30pm EST
, sometimes set up because there's a tough problem and people don't want to do anything about it. they get a report and it goes away. so but this commission was supposed to put the facts on top of the table. and the future would depend on what it found out. how aggressive it was, and what the public thought about what they were doing. >> it was initially set up as relatively a temporary commission. >> right. it was temp prior and a deal with -- and it came the year before the little rock crisis. and all kinds of ferment going on in the country. and eisenhower -- it was to defuse part of the crisis, and present it better immafnlgt country to the world and if on the way they could recommend solutions that would be great. >> so who made up the first commission? who was the chair. >> the first commission, the idea to put people on there who would be respected especially the chairman. is somebody who people think the person's objective. and put the chairman who was the president of michigan state university over the . >> a white man? >> yes. he was made the president of it. they had one black m
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 7:15am EST
the covers of a book some of these days, tom. go ahead, sam i said. but don't disgrace my name. so that's an interview with the real tom sawyer in san francisco in october 23, 1898. so he gave multiple interviews. so this is the prologue, and this will give you an idea of what we're just talking about with a steam bath. it was the first tom sawyer had ever seen mark twain looking glum. 's lawyer study the journalist, disjointed body, i repaired, long black lethal looking cigar and soup strainer mustache. a lanky man, twain didn't really walk but ambled and slashed his way through the muddy streets and back alleys of san francisco. is normal dress was careless and disheveled. is close were i brushed and freckled with tobacco, though at this moment he was new, his chest of matted hair, drank his eyes landed like an eagle. on this rainy afternoon in jun june 1863, twain was nursing a bad hangover inside a steam rooms, halfway through it was intended to be -- that stretched three years. sleepwalking and melancholic journalists regularly went to the turkish baths this without any suicidal te
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 4:00pm EST
to be honest with you, and i don't know if the press would appreciate my saying this, but, um, when i wrote, when i wrote the manuscript, "embattled first lady" was actually the chapter that dealt with the problems within the white house. the press, i named the whole book "pat nixon. every woman in the white house," which i thought that's what she represented. but they liked the embattled first lady name better, and so the press wins. so that is really kind of how that happened. >> ms. brennan, will you kindly speak to pat ryan before she was mrs. nixon? >> many -- certainly. you want me to tell about her childhood? >> yes. and i was also, i would also like you to respond, was she a teacher? >> yes. she, um, actually, she had a very -- when i said at the end that as she had her whole life, she made the best of a bad situation, her mother died when she was 12, and she had two brothers ander father. she helped to take care of the house and, um, to kind of keep everything in order and then go to school where she got very good grades. ended up through kind of a fluke of circumstances that she a
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 6:00am EST
of union. the courts presence at the state oof the union has decreased with the justices saying i don't want to be a potted plant at a political pep rally, et cetera. so there are other ways we can see maybe the public thinks of the court more in political terms or the court is more aware of what it does and doesn't want to do activities of other branches of government. >> your thoughts on how conservative this court is compared to other times? >> no, i'm not going to go there. but i would say that what's interesting is not a politicize the court is but whether it reflects the majority reviews of the american people. and i don't know the answer to that but i think that's a very interesting question because in the past i think the court always has by and large done that. >> and just briefly one of the measure might be the political activity the supreme court a spouses. is jenny thomas -- >> anyone in mind? >> is jenny thomas and her political activism just sort of an outlier case, or does it represent the fact that some of the spouses of justice are stepping out of the shadows and asse
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